Journal 2013-14 Vol 29

01. Cover Page

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02. Acknowledgement

Journal of History ISSN (Print Edition) 0976-5476 Vol 29 (2012-13) Published on behalf of the Department of History, Jadavpur University, Kolkata-700032, India. Editor Suchetana Chattopadhyay Editorial Board Nupur Dasgupta Samita Sen Rupkumar Barman Kaushik Roy Samarpita Mitra Cover Design Tilottama Mukherjee Cover Photo Suchetana Chattopadhyay Photo Location Bhabanipur, Kolkata This is a peer-reviewed journal where referees remain anonymous and the identity of the author is disclosed to the referee if the submitted article is recommended for publication. The editor is the sole intermediary between the referee and the author. We follow the Chicago Manual of style. We deal sternly with […]

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03. Table of Contents

Table of Contents Editorial Note Denis Matringe A Sant-Sipahi by Himself: The Spiritual and Military Autobiography of Guru Gobind Sabyasachi Bhattacharya Historical Anthropology and Bankim Chandra Chatterjee Nibabari Banerjee Representing Early Indian Women: The discourse of liberal European Romanticism Chandrani Banerjee Mukherjee Situating Akshay Kumar Maitreya Sudeshna Purkayastha Indigenous Technology in Assam: Continuity and Transformation in the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries Book Review Preeta Bhattacharyya Revisiting Abhijnanasakuntalam: Love,Lineage and Language in Kalidasa’s Nataka. Edited by Saswati Sengupta and Deepika Tandon.

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04. Editorial Note

The current issue of Journal of History is being published in electronic and printed forms. We regret the delayed appearance as a consequence of this transformation. This is a departure in the history of the journal and we hope to explore a paperless, online route in the coming years.

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05. A Sant-Sipahi by Himself: The Spiritual and Military Autobiography of Guru Gobind

A Sant-Sipahi by Himself: The Spiritual and Military Autobiography of Guru Gobind Denis Matringe The present article is concerned with a particular specimen of royal poetry written in the Shivaliks: a seemingly autobiographical poem attributed to the tenth and last Guru of the Sikhs, Gobind, born in 1666; he was the Guru from 1675 to his death in 1708. The text I am going to examine is found in the second sacred book of the Sikhs, the Dasam Granth, and is entitled Bacitra Nataka (The Wonderful Drama). Though it has recently been used by scholars engaged in new approaches of […]

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06. Historical Anthropology and Bankim Chandra Chatterjee

Historical Anthropology and Bankim Chandra Chatterjee Sabyasachi Bhattacharya Although the modern proponents of Historical Anthropology tend to claim to be the founders of a new social science, it is worthwhile to look back on the explorations in that area by Bankim Chandra Chatterjee. Anthropology is one of the youngest of the social sciences and thus in the mid-nineteenth century it was as yet an emerging science which shared a space with historiography of ancient societies and civilisations, study of folk-lore and mythology, and ethnographic observer reports of ‘primitive’ cultures by explorers and colonial administrators. The boundaries of the emerging science […]

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07. Representing Early Indian Women: The Discourse of Liberal European Romanticism

Representing Early Indian Women: The discourse of liberal European Romanticism Nibabari Banerjee William Jones’ translation of the Sanskrit drama, ‘Sacontala’, referred to Indian women in the past. It did not involve any historical analysis; by translating the drama he created history. He mentioned, ‘Give us time, we may say, for our investigations, and we will transfer to Europe all the sciences, arts and literature of Asia’. The translation was the initial step. He did not offer any critical observation and glorified Indian culture to a great extent that expressed the ideological framework of his work. Irrespective of the fact that […]

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08. Situating Akshay Kumar Maitreya

Situating Akshay Kumar Maitreya Chandrani Banerjee Mukherjee The writing of Indian history in the modern times began with the orientalist scholars but the process underwent a major transformation during the second half of the nineteenth century with the emergence of the nationalist school. The newly educated middle classes in India became aware of a ‘usable’ past, which needed fresh investigations. Although the nationalists had imbibed the notions of a glorious Indian past from their orientalist predecessors, orientalist literature was not deemed sufficient. The spirit of anti-colonial nationalism had evoked deeper commitments and scholars took up the task of investigation in […]

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09. Indigenous Technology in Assam

Indigenous Technology in Assam Continuity and Transformation in the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries Sudeshna Purkayastha Though manual skill often surpassed the technological aptitude in South Asian craft culture, indigenous technologies had a productive role with larger impact on society. The present study has taken traditional technology of Assam as the subject and seeks to explore the role of technology in the major indigenous industrial production like textile, both cotton and silk, iron, both smelting and smithy, gold washing, bell metal and pottery. The study also tries to focus on the dynamics of continuity of technology in the region and […]

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10. Book Review

Revisiting Abhijnanasakuntalam: Love,Lineage and Language in Kalidasa’s Nataka. Edited by Saswati Sengupta and Deepika Tandon, Orient Blackswan, New Delhi, 2011, 327 pages. Preeta Bhattacharya (Assistant Professor, Department of Ancient Indian History and Culture, Calcutta University) Perhaps it is not surprising that the idea of ‘Revisiting Abhijñ?ana?akuntalam: Love, Lineage and Language in Kalidasa’s Nataka’ took shape in the undergraduate classrooms of Miranda House College. The Abhijñ?ana?akuntalamof Kalid?sa was incorporated in an optional paper on ‘Classical Literatures’ for English Honours students. Even though the classrooms buzz with inherited preconceptions and the method of instruction is inevitably authoritarian, theyoften have the advantage of […]

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